Arizona Game and FIsh Department - Managing Today for Wildlife Tomorrow: azgfd.gov Arizona Game and Fish Department
  

Phone Number
BUY LICENSES | BIG GAME DRAW | eNEWS | CALENDAR | VIDEO | HUNTING | FISHING | WILDLIFE VIEWING | CONSERVATION | EDUCATION | BOATING | SHOOTING | OHV | SITE MAP | EMPLOYMENT
Arizona Game and Fish Department home page
   
Wildlife News
Shooting Sports News
Call for Comments
Public Advisories
Public Meetings
Arizona Outdoor Calendar
Media Services
Archive Search
Customer Service
  Game and Fish names "most revoked" individual

News Media
Jul 21, 2005

PHOENIX -  The Arizona Game and Fish Department has revoked the hunting, fishing, and trapping privileges of a Payson man, making him the most revoked individual in Arizona history.

On June 24 the Arizona Game and Fish Commission voted to revoke Wesley Frost's privileges to take wildlife until the year 2031. Frost, who was already on license revocation until 2016, was revoked for 15 additional years after pleading guilty to three charges of unlawful taking of wildlife during the revocation period.

"Frost has on multiple occasions chosen not to follow the laws of the state of Arizona," says Ron Day, the head of the department's law enforcement branch. "If you want to hunt, fish or trap you must do it legally, with a proper license, during the appropriate season, and abide by Game and Fish Department rules and regulations."

In 2002, undercover investigators caught Frost capturing a young javelina in Coconino County. "Though Frost did not kill the animal, he removed it from its herd, left it on its own, and greatly reduced its chance of survival," says Day.

Later the same year, Frost was cited for hunting a mountain lion on a revoked license, then cited a third time for hunting bear. 

Although many western states have a lifetime revocation law, Arizona does not. The Arizona Game and Fish Department is considering asking the legislature to adopt such a law.

"If Arizona had a lifetime revocation it would first allow us to take away Frost's hunting privileges for the rest of his life. Then if he later were convicted of poaching it would be a class six felony punishable by up to a year and a half in prison and up to a $100,000 fine," says Day.

In 1997, Frost was sentenced to four months in a Gila County jail for his involvement in the unlawful killing of a mountain lion.

"We sure hope Arizonans will not judge all hunters based on Frost's illegal actions. We know that most license holders are honest sports men and women who work hard to conserve wildlife. We don't want violators to damage the reputation of Arizona's ethical hunters," says Day. 


 
E-mail this article
Printer friendly page
Search the newsroom

Related AZGFD Info
- Colorado River states join together for Operation Dry Water
- Tri-Boating Safety Fair promoting “Go Boating Safely!”
- Get ready for the largest hands-on Outdoor Expo in Arizona
- A lucky day for endangered fish at McDowell Mountain Regional Park
- News conference videotape about collared jaguar available online

Mission | Frequently Asked Questions | Web Policy | Send Comments | Employment | Commission Agenda | Office Locations | Site Map | Search | © 2013 AZGFD