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Ringtail
 
Additional Furbearer Species pages
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Ringtail  
Distribution
Ringtail   Habitat
 
Ringtails have long, slender bodies from 10 to 14 inches in length with bushy, equally long black and white banded tails. The fur is a soft grayish brown with black-tipped hairs. Both the ears and eyes appear oversized, and the latter are outlined in white making them seem even larger. The legs are short, and the hind feet can be rotated 180 degrees like those of a tree squirrel, enabling the animal to descend vertical surfaces. Weights vary from 2 to 2 ½ pounds, the males being slightly larger than the females. Primarily a night-time animal, ringtails can be extremely bold and unconcerned about the presence of humans. Calls consist of a repertoire of barks, chirps, growls, howls, and yips.

Ringtails are found in rocky areas throughout Arizona with about the only areas devoid of ringtails being flat, alluvial valleys.

Natural History
The ringtail’s diet varies with the seasons but usually consists of small mammals, birds, lizards, and insects, as well as plant fruits, e.g., tomatillo berries. In farm areas, the ringtail may be an important predator on chickens and other poultry. Generally, four young are born in the spring.

Hunting and Trapping History

Ringtail cats are not a target species for trappers and usually taken incidentally. With the decline in the number of trappers, as well as the prohibition on the use of foot hold traps, the number of ringtail cats taken statewide has declined significantly to less than 50 animals a year.

Updated April 2009

 
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Downloads [More]


Hunting, Trapping & Fishing Regulations, Season Dates & Draw Information

Detailed information on all rules, regulations and seasons

  • New! 2013-2014 Arizona Hunting Regulations [PDF, 6mb]

  • Hunt Permit-Tag Application Form [PDF]
  • New! 2014 Antelope & Elk Hunt Draw Regulations
    [PDF, 4mb]

  • 2014 Spring Hunt Draw Regulations [PDF]

  • 2013-2014 Waterfowl & Snipe Regulations [PDF]

  • New! 2013-2014 Dove & Band-tailed Pigeon Regs [PDF]

  • 2013 Sandhill Crane Regulations [PDF]

  • Hunt Arizona 2012: Survey, Harvest and Draw Data
    [PDF, 6mb]

  • 2013-2014 Trapping Regulations [PDF]


  • 2014 AZ Fishing Regulations
    [PDF, 7mb]
  • 2014 Urban Fishing Guidebook
    [PDF, 9mb]
  • 2013 Amphibian and Reptile Regulations [PDF]

  • 2013-14 Raptor Regulations [PDF]
  • Arizona Residency Requirements [PDF]
NOTE: The above files are PDF's and require the free Adobe Acrobat Reader.

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