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Game Management Unit 12B

 
Additional Hunting Unit Report pages
- Region I - Pinetop
- Region IV - Yuma
- Region II - Flagstaff
- Region V - Tucson
- Region III - Kingman
- Region VI - Mesa
 

Species within this unit:

 
Unit Boundaries

Beginning at U.S. Hwy 89A and the Kaibab National Forest boundary near mp 566; southerly and easterly along the forest boundary to Grand Canyon National Park; northeasterly along the park boundary to Glen Canyon National Recreation area; easterly along the recreation area boundary to the Colorado River; northeasterly along the Colorado River to the Arizona-Utah state line; westerly along the state line to Kanab Creek; southerly along Kanab Creek to the Kaibab National Forest boundary; northerly, easterly, and southerly along this boundary to U.S. Hwy 89A near mp 566; except those portions that are sovereign tribal lands of the Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians.

The Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Strip District, 345 E. Riverside Drive, St. George, Utah, 84770, phone (435) 688-3200 manages the majority of unit 12B.  No motor vehicles are allowed in the Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. These areas are open to foot and horseback travel only. Motor vehicle travel is restricted to existing roads on all BLM land in the Unit. No off-road travel by motor vehicles is allowed.

The state line is only marked at dirt road crossings. The AZ/UT state line on a GPS unit is N37° 00.0' latitude. It is the hunter's responsibility to know where they are and the state line is patrolled heavily by both Utah and Arizona law enforcement.

Note: 12BW is the entire portion of 12B that is west of BLM road 1065 (House Rock Valley/ Coyote Valley Road), excluding the Paria Plateau. 12BE is the entire portion of 12B that is east of BLM road 1065 (House Rock Valley/ Coyote Valley Road).  The BLM 1065 road runs north from U.S. Hwy 89A to U.S. Hwy 89 in Utah between the Buckskin Mountains and the Paria Plateau.  

 
Species Information back to top
Elk and Buffalo

 

*There are currently no Population Management Seasons for buffalo or elk tags available for successfully drawn deer hunters in Units 12B or 12BW.

The Arizona Game and Fish Commission authorized over-the-counter (OTC) elk tags that include units 12A and 12B and others (see regulations). Please contact any department office for additional information or to purchase an elk OTC tag. Hunters should note, the OTC elk tag is not a companion or corresponding tag and has its own hunting season dates, areas and other restrictions.

Over-the-counter elk seasons are described on page 23 of the 2010 pronghorn antelope and elk regulations.

Hunters interested in purchasing an elk tag should be aware that this unit has few elk and is considered a limited opportunity hunt. Hunt sucess is very low for this hunt. During the cooler months, elk will occasionally move south to the Kaibab from southern Utah. In the last couple of years, only a few elk have been spotted along the 12A/ 12B/12BW boundary on the west side of the Kaibab Plateau. The Grand Canyon National Park is not open to hunting. Learn more

*clarified information 10-07-08 db

 

 
Antelope

Overview: Antelope in Hunt Units 12A/12B are found primarily in House Rock Valley on the east side of the Kaibab Plateau in the grassland/desert scrub.  Pronghorn are also found along the edge of the plateau in the pinyon-juniper transition zone.  Although this herd is only estimated to have around 90 animals, the herd appears to be fairly stable. In an attempt to boost this herd, the Arizona Game and Fish Department in collaboration with Utah division of Wildlife, BLM and other interested parties has conducted several pronghorn antelope transplants into House Rock Valley over the last couple of years.  There is also a small herd that lives just south of Fredonia in the grassland/ low shrub density areas.  This herd generally varies from 15 to 30 animals, depending on movement between 13A and Utah.   Although 12A/12B is not known for its “record breaking” antelope bucks, hunt success has typically been around 40% for archery and 100% for rifle.     

This area is very remote with only a few conveniences provided at the communities of Vermilion Cliffs, Cliff Dwellers, Marble Canyon and Jacob Lake.  Roads in the unit can become extremely muddy when wet and heavy rains frequently wash out the main roads, thus it is important to be prepared with suitable shelter, plenty of food, water and extra fuel.  Having extra spare tires would also be a good idea.  

Areas:  The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) manages most of House Rock Valley, allowing unrestricted access to antelope country. The BLM Arizona Strip map or the USFS Kaibab Forest map can aid you with road navigation.  There are three working cattle ranches in House Rock Valley,  therefore it is important to leave gates how they are found (unless signs specify otherwise), be aware of the presence of cattle, and not tamper with water sources.  The Arizona Game and Fish Department's House Rock Wildlife Area is also located in the hunting area and is open to hunting.  Buffalo may also be seen while on the Wildlife Area.

Pronghorn in House Rock Valley generally tend to be located within 6 to 7 miles of the base of the Kaibab Plateau.  Drier habitat conditions further to the east limit use of this area.   As mentioned above, the main concentration of antelope is in House Rock Valley.  There are several small herds that reside on the north side of Highway 89A in the grassland.   North of Kane Ranch, there are a few groups of antelope scattered throughout the rolling hills. You will find the majority of antelope south and east of the ranch and all the way out to the rim of Marble Canyon.  There are generally one or two herds on South Canyon Point, however this area is more difficult to access as there are few roads in the area. 

Good optics are a must for both scouting and glassing during your hunt.  Most of House Rock Valley is fairly flat with low rolling hills, so it is important to be able to locate the antelope from a distance and plan your stalk according to the surrounding terrain and conditions. There are many stock tanks located throughout House Rock Valley and the antelope herds tend to center their activities around these water sources depending on the frequency of summer monsoons.  Glassing from the slopes of the Kaibab plateau can give you a higher vantage point.

Remember that hunting with the aid of a vehicle is prohibited. This includes chasing, pursuing, or herding antelope with any type of vehicle. Shooting from a vehicle and from the roadway is also prohibited. Traveling off established roads is prohibited throughout House Rock Valley on BLM and Wilderness land. 



 
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Bighorn Sheep

Overview: Desert bighorn sheep were eliminated from Unit 12B in the early 1900's probably due to diseases they received from interacting with domestic sheep. Large numbers of domestic sheep grazed on the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, and Paria Canyon until the 1960's when the Bureau of Land Management converted all grazing permits to cattle only. A total of 52 desert bighorn sheep were transplanted in the Paria Canyon-Vermillion Cliffs area in 1984 and 1985 from unit 15B near Lake Mead.  The population grew to about 160 bighorns within the first 8 years but began to slowly decline in the mid-90s.  The current population estimate is around 150 sheep. Although prolonged drought has affected the production and recruitment of lambs, more lambs and young sheep have been observed in the last couple years.  From  2000 - 2008, there have been 1 to 2 permits issued per year with hunt success around 100%. In October of 2009 an extensive survey of the unit revealed that bighorn now occupy a larger area than that previously documented. As a result of this survey the population estimate was increased and the tags available for the 2009 hunt were increased to three. The average Boone and Crockett score for the last 3 years has been in the low to mid-150s.

Most of the desert bighorn sheep in unit 12BE are found within the Paria Canyon-Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness Area.  The Paria Plateau, which is surrounded by the Paria canyon-Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness Area,  has few roads and can only be accessed from BLM road 1065 on the west side of the plateau.  This area is very isolated and will require 4-wheel drive for the soft sandy roads.  There are no services on top of the Paria Plateau.  The north rim of the Paria Canyon is accessed from Big Water, Utah and also requires 4-wheel drive due to soft sand. There are only a few conveniences provided along Hwy 89A in the small communities of Vermilion Cliffs, Cliff Dwellers, Marble Canyon and Jacob Lake.  Thus it is important to be prepared with suitable shelter, plenty of food, water and lots of extra fuel.  Having extra spare tires would also be a good idea.

Areas: The highest densities of bighorn sheep are going to be in the Paria Canyon-Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness Area from above the community of Vermillion Cliffs to Bush head.  Bighorn have typically been harvested along the rim of the Paria Plateau near Bush Head, Powell's Monument, and Fisher Point. Some bighorns have also been taken from the north rim of the Paria Canyon and near spring sources along the Vermilion Cliffs. During December, sheep are generally found at lower elevations on the talus slopes below the steep cliff faces.  The 2009 survey documented that good populations of bighorn occupy the southern edge of the plateau.  Hunters should examine this area as well. Spring sources along the Vermilion Cliffs are best accessed by horseback or hiking from Highway 89A 2 or 3 miles to the base of the cliffs.  It is common to observe bighorns in locations where it is not possible to recover them. Make sure that you can access the area before taking the shot.
 
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Mule Deer

Notice: Archery deer hunters - Unit 12B and 12B West are not an open area for over-the-counter tag holders as of April, 2008. To hunt Unit 12B or 12B you must now obtain a permt-tag through the big game draw process. Click here for more details.

Important Note: (See unit description under Unit Boundaries)  12BW includes the Buckskins to the north of the Kaibab and the west side winter range including Pigeon Canyon and Gunsight Point. It excludes the Paria Plateau and any areas east of BLM road 1065.  Hunters with a 12B permit (vs. 12BW permit) may hunt the Paria Plateau as well as the rest of the Unit. Permit numbers for the 12B hunt are very limited. The separation of 12BW from 12B was designed to limit the number of hunters and the deer harvest on the Paria Plateau, but not restrict a hunter with a 12B permit to only hunting the Paria Plateau.  This was put into place to address concerns about the small resident deer population on the Paria Plateau which can be greatly affected by drought and low fawn production.  Hunters who have no desire to hunt the Paria Plateau and want to hunt the Buckskins or the west side winter range should apply for a 12B West permit. Likewise, hunters who want to hunt the Paria Plateau must apply for a 12B permit. 

Overview: This unit is primarily winter range for migratory deer from both the North Kaibab Plateau in Arizona and from the Paunsaugant Plateau in southern Utah. Elevation ranges from 4000 to 7000 feet with vegetation consisting primarily of pinion-juniper and sagebrush flats.  Studies have shown that the Paunsaugunt deer arrive in Unit 12B in mid-October through early November, extending southward about 8 miles into Arizona. Deer from the North Kaibab start migrating northward to merge with the Utah deer in early-November.  Very few deer reside in 12BW year round, making it difficult to hunt during the archery season in September.

The central part of the unit, the Buckskin Mountains, contains the highest deer densities and is best to hunt after mid-October.  The Paria Plateau to the east has the lowest number of deer.  This is a small resident herd and is not part of the deer that migrate from Paunsaugunt or the Kaibab.  

The Alternative Deer Management Plan provides the guidelines for which decisions on hunt recommendations are made. The early hunt is managed for hunter opportunity and usually occurs during the early part of the deer migration, thus few older-age class bucks are found during the early hunt.  Majority of the deer harvested on the early hunt are younger bucks around 2 years of age.  Many hunters go home disappointed that they did not see big bucks on the early hunt, but every hunter should do their homework and know what they should expect on a hunt before setting high expectations.  Unlike the early hunt, the late hunt is managed for harvesting older aged deer, having high hunter success, and low density of hunters. 

The majority of the unit is public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Strip District, 345 E. Riverside Drive, St. George, Utah 84770, phone (435) 688-3200. 

Areas: The Buckskin Mountains in the central portion of the unit contains the highest densities of deer and is best to hunt after mid-October.  As the weather continues to cool down and the snow fall increases, Kaibab deer from the western portion of the plateau move down towards Pigeon Canyon, Toothpick Ridge and Gunsight Point, making this area best after early November. 

If you have a 12B tag and are trying to decide whether to hunt 12BW or the Paria Plateau, there are a few additional things that you should consider.  The Paria Plateau in eastern 12B has the lowest density of deer and is not part of the migratory herds from the Kaibab Plateau or the Paunsaugant.  Access to the Paria Plateau can be difficult and deer difficult to find so scouting before the hunt is extremely important. 

If you are deciding whether to put in for the draw for the 12B or 12BW archery hunt, there is a few things that you should know first.  Archery hunts anywhere in 12B are very difficult, with the hunt success typically between 0 and 9% as the available deer are very limited.  North Kaibab and Paunsaugunt herds have not yet migrated into the unit and generally do not start to do so until a month or so after the archery hunt is over.  There are a few resident herds scattered across 12B, making this hunt very similar to archery hunting in desert.  These herds will be closely tied to water sources in the absence of rain and will typically be located at higher elevations.    

During the early 12B hunts, deer are typically concentrated in the pinyon-juniper and along meadow edges at higher elevations in the Buckskins, southwest toward Snake Gulch.  Scouting is recommended only a week or two prior to the start of the hunt, due to the nature of the migration pattern. 

Deer begin to move down from the top Buckskin Mountains to the pinyon-juniper and sagebrush flats as the snow pushes them off the plateau during the late hunt.  Depending on the amount of snow fall, Pigeon Canyon and Gunsight Point to the west are generally best after early November.  Deer are can be found in the open sagebrush flats, but not until snow pushes them out of the trees.

No motor vehicles are allowed in the Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. These areas are open to foot and horseback travel only. Motor vehicle travel is restricted to existing roads on all BLM land in the Unit. No off-road travel by motor vehicles is allowed. Be prepared for snow, mud, and adverse weather conditions, and bring plenty of supplies. Very few services are available for gas and food.

Note: The state line is only marked at dirt road crossings. The AZ/UT state line on a GPS unit is N37° 00.0' latitude. It is the hunter's responsibility to know where they are and the state line is patrolled heavily by both Utah and Arizona law enforcement.

 

 
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Chukar

Overview: Chukar Partridge is an overlooked game bird in this unit. This exotic game bird, native to the Middle East, was introduced into various areas in Arizona.  This bird was first documented in 12B in Paria Canyon, but has since been regularly observed along the Kanab Creek/ Snake Gulch drainage.  Chukar also been occasionally observed in drainages to the Colorado River and along the Vermillion Cliffs in the wilderness area in 12BE. 

Areas: Chukar are found throughout the Kanab Creek drainage and associated side canyons and in Paria Canyon and Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area. This game bird tends to concentrate around water sources, especially along steep cliffs. 

Chukars are generally found within the lower 8 or 9 miles of Paria Canyon, along the rim of the Paria Plateau, and at spring sources along the Vermilion Cliffs.  The majority of Chukar observed along the rim of the Paria Plateau are in the vicinity of Bush Head, Powell's Monument, and Fisher Point.  Hunting in the bottom of the Paria Canyon requires hiking with wet feet in sandy terrain along the Paria River. Birds can sometimes be found along the Paria River, but they generally occupy the upper benches along the cliffs, high above the river.  Other areas to consider are Badger Springs and Soap Spring along the Vermillion Cliffs within the wilderness area.  There are no easy ways to hunt them, but the breath-taking scenery makes it a great place to try.

Chukar are not numerous anywhere in Kanab Creek or its associated drainages. Birds are usually found in isolated coveys, and can (usually do) descend thousands of feet into inaccessible canyons after being flushed.  Occasionally, depending on rainfall and the availability of forage, coveys can be found in some of the shallow drainages along Kanab Creek.  

The Paria Plateau has no services and is accessed from Coyote Valley Road (BLM Road 1065). It is very sandy and requires 4-wheel drive.
 
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Unit Summary
Primary Game Species/ Hunting Month(s)
Mule Deer November
Bighorn Sheep December
Antelope September
Secondary Game Species/ Hunting Month(s)
Waterfowl October-January
Mountain Lion September-May
Average # permits in past 5 years
Mule Deer 275
Bighorn Sheep 1
Antelope 7
 
Climate Information
Month Ave. Temp Ave. Rainfall Ave. Snowfall
January Max 42°/Min 24° 0.54" 2.0"
February Max 50°/Min 31° 0.48" 0.8"
March Max 59°/Min 37° 0.66" 0.2"
April Max 69°/Min 44° 0.44" 0.1"
May Max 79°/Min 53° 0.44" 0.0"
June Max 91°/Min 63° 0.17" 0.0"
July Max 96°/Min 69° 0.50" 0.0"
August Max 93°/Min 67° 0.66" 0.0"
September Max 84°/Min 58° 0.57" 0.0"
October Max 71°/Min 47° 0.79" 0.0"
November Max 54°/Min 35° 0.55" 0.5"
December Max 44°/Min 26° 0.53" 1.4"
Other Pertinent Climate Information
During big winter storms, unit experiences snowfalls that can make travel hazardous. Boaters on Lake Powell should check wind advisories daily and exercise caution near tour boat wakes.
 
Cities, Roads & Campgrounds
Major Cities and Towns in or Near Game Management Unit and Nearest Gas, Food, and Lodging
Page, Marble Canyon, Jacob Lake, Cliff Dwellers, Fredonia
Major Highways and Roads Leading To
From the East: State Hwy 98
From the West: State Hwy 389
From the North: U.S. Hwy 89
From the South: U.S. Hwy 89
Developed Campgrounds
Wahweap Marina Campground at Lake Powell, administered by the National Park Service; Page Lake Powell Campground, 849 S. Coppermine Rd. in Page; Lees Ferry Campground, 4 miles north of Marble Canyon, administered by the National Park Service
Undeveloped Campgrounds
Camping is allowed on BLM administered lands over most of the unit. On National Park Service lands, camping is restricted to designated areas.
 
Brief Description of Terrain, Elevation, and Vegetation
Elevations range from approximately 4,000' in Glen Canyon to 7,000' on the Paria Plateau. The deeply eroded terrain is characterized by many protruding rock formations, with the massive sandstone Vermilion Cliffs dominating the landscape. Alluvial sandy soils occur throughout most of the unit and vegetation is sparse, consisting mainly of sagebrush at lower elevations and pinyon-juniper trees at higher elevations.
 
Government Agencies and Phone Numbers
Arizona Game and Fish Department, Region II - 928 774-5045
Bureau of Land Management, AZ Strip Field Office - 435 688-3200
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area - 928 608-6200
Grand Canyon National Park, North Rim - 928 638-7870
City of Page Chamber of Commerce - 928 645-2741
 
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