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Game Management Unit 19B - Updated May 2012

 
Additional Hunting Unit Report pages
- Region I - Pinetop
- Region IV - Yuma
- Region II - Flagstaff
- Region V - Tucson
- Region III - Kingman
- Region VI - Mesa
 

Species within this unit:

 

***Unit 19B has important access issues that sportsman should be aware of
before applying for hunts or going afield***

Most of the private property associated with the Big Chino Valley (from Paulden to Seligman) has been closed to public access.  Other private property near Picacho Butte has been closed to public access.  These properties have been closed for various reasons including:  littering while hunting/camping, irresponsible Off-Highway-Vehicle use while hunting, failing to close gates while hunting/scouting, vandalism while hunting/scouting and unsporting behavior while hunting.  It is unlawful to trespass on properly posted private property, even to access public or State Trust lands.
The main areas where public access can be found are on United States Forest Service (USFS) administered lands in the eastern and western edges of Unit 19B. A portion of the Juniper Mountains is located in the western portion of Unit 19B, and can be accessed off Williamson Valley Road. Big Black Mesa is located in the eastern portion of the unit and portions of it can be accessed off State Route 89. A Prescott National Forest map (at a minimum) can be used to navigate most of Unit 19B (except the northern portion). BLM 1:100,000 scale topographic maps (Prescott and Williams) show land status and some topographic features. More detailed maps showing land status and topographic features can also be helpful.

 
Unit Boundaries

Beginning at the intersection of U.S. Hwy 89 and AZ Hwy 69 northwesterly through Prescott to the junction of Williamson Valley Road and Iron Springs Road; northerly on the Williamson Valley-Prescott-Seligman Road FR 6, Williamson Valley Road to AZ Hwy 66 at Seligman; east on Crookton Road (AZ Hwy 66) to I-40 (Exit 139); east on I-40 to U.S. Hwy 89; south on U.S. Hwy 89 to the junction with AZ Hwy 69; except those portions that are sovereign tribal lands of the Yavapai-Prescott Tribe.

 
Species Information  
 

Pronghorn Antelope

Overview:
The grassland habitat the antelope inhabit in Unit 19B can be found from the north end of the unit to the south. Due to the loss of hunter access in large portions of Unit 19B, there are fewer permits given than in the past. Hunters who apply for Unit 19B antelope tags should secure access to private property before applying. Hunters who draw an antelope tag in Unit 19B should not expect a traditional public-land hunting experience and should be prepared to make contact with landowners. Some landowners may require hunters to pay a “trespass fee” to access hunting areas, and others may not give permission to trespass at all. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

Areas: 
Big Chino Valley - The Big Chino Valley is a broad valley that runs from the Seligman area in the northwest to the Paulden area in the southeast. Big Chino Wash drains the Big Chino Valley and feeds the headwaters of the Verde River. The majority of the Big Chino Valley is made up of grassland habitat that is ideal for antelope, but private property and access issues make it hard to find accessible areas to hunt. This area holds the majority of antelope in Unit 19B.

I-40 corridor - Antelope can be found along the I-40 corridor in limited numbers and areas in the northern portion of Unit 19B. Hunters should be aware of the northern boundary for Unit 19B while hunting the area. There are issues associated with private property and access in this area, but some State Trust Land sections can be accessed from Route 66 and I-40.

Deep Well - The grasslands on the Deep Well Ranch (between Prescott and Chino Valley) hold decent populations of antelope. The area does have some State Trust Lands that can be accessed, but private property and access issues exist here also.

 
Elk

Overview:
Unit 19B is managed as a Flexible Population Management Zone using Limited Opportunity season structures. Unit 19B and some adjacent hunt units are combined to form large hunt areas in order to provide sportsmen a better opportunity to harvest an elk. The elk populations in these units, however, are generally low compared to some other units in the state. The elk populations in these units are also widely dispersed. Hunters may have a difficult time finding elk without spending a significant amount of time scouting prior to the season.
Access to hunt elk in Unit 19B can be very difficult. About 80% of Unit 19B is privately owned deeded lands or private State Trust Lands that may be checker-boarded. Hunters (even if familiar with the area) may have a difficult time finding elk or run into access problems with private land. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

Areas:
All of the areas listed below can be dependent on elk movements into Unit 19B from adjacent units such as Units 8, 10, 17A and B, and 18A.

Big Chino Valley - Elk can be found seasonally using croplands on several of the farms in the Big Chino Valley. The availability of corn and alfalfa determine the elk distribution in this center portion of Unit 19B. The Big Chino Valley has lots of private land and access issues associated with it.

Juniper Mountains - Elk can be found in the Juniper Mountains, which are west of the Big Chino Valley along the western edge of Unit 19B. Most of this area is a checkerboard of Prescott National Forest and private land within the boundaries of the Yavapai Ranch. Access has been granted to hunters through an agreement between the Yavapai Ranch and the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Hunters should always pick up litter, leave gates as they are found (usually closed), never drive off-road in any vehicle (Including ATV’s), and limit travel on roads during wet weather to reduce rutting.

Picacho Butte - Elk can be found in limited numbers in the Picacho Butte area. This area has lots of private land and access issues associated with it.

Big Black Mesa - Elk can be found in the Big Black Mesa area. There are limited water sources in this area, so locating them while scouting might help hunters find elk sign. Although some of the mesa is Prescott National Forest land, the northern and western portions of the mesa are on private property and have access issues. The portion of Big Black Mesa on the Prescott National Forest can be accessed from Highway 89. There is also a small sliver of Kaibab National Forest situated below Big Black Mesa just north of Hell Canyon. The area can be accessed from Highway 89.
 
Javelina

Overview:
Javelina are spread out across Unit 19B. Javelina herds live near water sources such as springs, seeps, and earthen livestock tanks. During the javelina hunting seasons, they are most active in the morning, but javelina may feed throughout the day. Javelina do not have dense fur coats like other game animals, so looking for javelina on a sunny slope on a cold morning can sometimes pay off.  Hunting javelina in Unit 19B can be frustrating due to the thick juniper woodland habitat type in most of the accessible areas. Javelina hunters should focus their efforts on more open slopes, or the edges of the grasslands. Using quality binoculars mounted on a tripod and patience can also increase a hunter’s chances of finding javelina. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

Areas:
Big Black Mesa- There are javelina located on and around Big Black Mesa. Although some of the mesa is Prescott National Forest land, the northern and western portions of the mesa are on private property and have access issues. The portion of Big Black Mesa on the Prescott National Forest can be accessed from Highway 89.

Juniper Mountains - The portion of the Juniper Mountains in Unit 19B (east of the Williamson Valley Road) holds a decent population of javelina. Most of this area is a checkerboard of Prescott National Forest and private land within the boundaries of the Yavapai Ranch. Access has been granted to hunters through an agreement between the Yavapai Ranch and the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Hunters should always pick up litter, leave gates as they are found (usually closed), never drive off-road in any vehicle (Including ATV’s), and limit travel on roads during wet weather to reduce rutting.

Walnut Creek - The portion of Walnut Creek in Unit 19B (east of the Williamson Valley Road) also holds a decent population of javelina. Some of this area is Prescott National Forest, and some is private deeded land of the K-4 Ranch.  The K-4 Ranch does not allow public access to hunters on private land.

Quartz Lead Wash - This area holds decent numbers of javelina. Quartz Lead Wash drains easterly through juniper covered hills towards the Big Chino Valley. Portions of this area are on the Prescott National Forest, and portions are on private deeded land of the K-4 Ranch. The K-4 Ranch does not allow public access to hunters on private land.

Big Chino Valley - There are decent populations of javelina in the foothills surrounding the Big Chino Valley. This area has lots of private land and access issues associated with it.
 
Mountain Lion

Overview: Mountain lions occur mostly in the pinyon-juniper habitat in Unit 19B where mule deer are found. Lion sign can be found at waters and along ridges.  This unit is best described as a large grassland valley (Big Chino Valley) surrounded by pinyon-juniper covered mesas, buttes, and hills. Land ownership is a combination of Prescott National Forest land, State Trust Land, and private property. Access varies throughout these areas. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

Most lions harvested in Unit 19B are taken with the aid of hounds after a snowfall or by predator callers hunting in large canyons with fresh sign.

Areas:

See the areas for mule deer as the mule deer is the lion’s main prey species.
 
Mule Deer

Overview:
Mule deer are mostly found throughout the pinyon-juniper woodlands that surround the Big Chino Valley. Mule deer hunters should learn to vary their hunting techniques depending on habitat and terrain. Much of the pinyon-juniper woodland in Unit 19B is dense and still hunting or patient glassing of opposite slopes can increase a hunter’s chances of seeing deer. As with most western hunting, quality optics, and even mounting binoculars on a tripod will help hunters locate hard-to-find deer. If a good, elevated observation point is located, hunters should glass large canyons and drainages in a systematic fashion to locate moving deer during early morning and late afternoon/evening times. Being extremely patient can pay off when glassing. During dry years, hunting areas near water sources can also improve a hunter’s chances of seeing deer.
Pre-season scouting is strongly encouraged for Unit 19B mule deer hunters. The scouting should not only focus on locating deer and deer sign, but also on learning the lay of the land, unit boundaries, roads, ridges, and private property issues.

Land ownership is a combination of Prescott National Forest land, State Trust Land, and private property. Access varies throughout these areas. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

Areas:
Big Black Mesa - There are mule deer located on and around Big Black Mesa. Although some of the mesa is Prescott National Forest land, the northern and western portions of the mesa are on private property and have access issues. The portion of Big Black Mesa on the Prescott National Forest can be accessed from Highway 89.

Juniper Mountains - There are decent numbers of mule deer in the portion of the Juniper Mountains located in Unit 19B (east of the Williamson Valley Road). Most of this area is a checkerboard of Prescott National Forest and private land within the boundaries of the Yavapai Ranch. Access has been granted to hunters through an agreement between the Yavapai Ranch and the Arizona Game and Fish Department. Hunters should always pick up litter, leave gates as they are found (usually closed), never drive off-road in any vehicle (Including ATV’s), and limit travel on roads during wet weather to reduce rutting.

Walnut Creek - The portion of Walnut Creek in Unit 19B (east of the Williamson Valley Road) also holds a decent population of mule deer. Some of this area is Prescott National Forest, and some is private deeded land of the K-4 Ranch. The K-4 Ranch does not allow public access to hunters on private land.

Quartz Lead Wash - This area holds decent numbers of mule deer. Quartz Lead Wash drains easterly through juniper covered hills towards the Big Chino Valley. Portions of this area are on the Prescott National Forest, and portions are on private deeded land of the K-4 Ranch. The K-4 Ranch does not allow public access to hunters on private land.

Big Chino Valley - There are decent populations of mule deer in the buttes and foothills surrounding the Big Chino Valley. This area has lots of private land and access issues associated with it.
 
Dove

Overview:
The dove population varies with annual precipitation in Unit 19B, and is unpredictable and dispersed. Mourning doves can be readily found near permanent water sources during morning and evening hours although their numbers vary. Eurasian collared doves can be found near communities or areas near where people live. Be sure to check the Dove Hunting Regulations for specifics on shooting hours, open areas, and limits and remember to stay over a ¼-mile from houses/structures while discharging firearms. Dove hunters should pick up all empty shotgun shells as they are considered litter. Empty shells often accumulate due to the stationary nature of dove hunting and paint a negative picture of hunters if they are left behind.

Areas:
Specific areas are difficult to describe for Unit 19B due to the dispersed nature of its dove population. In general, cropland, railroad right-of-ways, and water holes are good sites for activity. Hunters should scout areas with public access to determine dove numbers. The main areas where public access can be found are on United States Forest Service (USFS) administered lands in the eastern and western edges of Unit 19B. A portion of the Juniper Mountains are located in the western portion of Unit 19B, and can be accessed off Williamson Valley Road. Big Black Mesa is located in the eastern portion of the unit and portions of it can be accessed off State Route 89. These areas contain water holes that may be good places to hunt doves. Also, railroad right-of-ways are good seed sources for doves. This is especially true during the late dove season. Be sure not to shoot from, across, or under railroads and roads. Many of the croplands in the Big Chino Valley where there are good numbers of doves have been closed to public access. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

 
Quail

Overview:
Gambel's quail can be found near permanent water sources scattered throughout the unit. This unit is best described as a large grassland valley (Big Chino Valley) that is surrounded by pinyon-juniper covered mesas, buttes, and hills. Land ownership is a combination of Prescott National Forest lands, State Trust Lands, and private lands.

Areas:
No specific areas can be described for this unit due to the dispersed nature of its quail population. However, hunters should look at water holes in the hills adjacent to grasslands for activity. The main areas where public access can be found are on United States Forest Service (USFS) administered lands in the eastern and western edges of Unit 19B. A portion of the Juniper Mountains is located in the western portion of Unit 19B, and can be accessed off Williamson Valley Road. Big Black Mesa is located in the eastern portion of the unit and portions of it can be accessed off State Route 89. Many of the water sources are shown on the Prescott National Forest map. Make sure you read the access information in red at the top of this page.

 
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Unit Summary
Primary Game Species/ Hunting Month(s)
Antelope August/September
Mule Deer August-January
Javelina January/February
Secondary Game Species/ Hunting Month(s)
Elk September/December
Mountain Lion Year-round
Climate Information
Month Ave. Temp Ave. Rainfall Ave. Snowfall
January Max 52°/Min 21° 1.0" 4.0"
February Max 57 °/Min 24° 1.0" 3.0"
March Max 61°/Min 27° 1.1" 1.8"
April Max 69°/Min 33° 0.6" 0.5"
May Max 78°/Min 40° 0.4" 0.2"
June Max 88°/Min 49° 0.4" 0.0"
July Max 93°/Min 58° 2.0" 0.0"
August Max 89°/Min 57° 2.3" 0.0"
September Max 86°/Min 47° 1.1" 0.0"
October Max 76°/Min 38° 1.0" 0.0"
November Max 63°/Min 27° 0.7" 0.5"
December Max 54°/Min 21° 0.9" 2.6"
Other Pertinent Climate Information
Mild winters and warm summers occur in this area. Snow on mesas may make travel hazardous. Summer monsoons often bring intense rainstorms. At present, drought conditions have resulted in extremely dusty travel.
 
Cities, Roads & Campgrounds
Major Cities and Towns in or Near Game Management Unit and Nearest Gas, Food, and Lodging
Prescott, Chino Valley, Seligman, Ash Fork
Major Highways and Roads Leading To
From the East: State Hwy 89
From the West: Williamson Valley Rd
From the North: I-40, Route 66
From the South: None
Developed Campgrounds
Commercial campgrounds (e.g., KOA) in Prescott, Seligman, and Ash Fork.
Undeveloped Campgrounds
Prescott National Forest is open to camping, with a limit of 14 days.
 
Brief Description of Terrain, Elevation, and Vegetation
The unit is characterized by high desert grassland valleys which are bordered by pinyon-juniper covered mesas. Elevation ranges from 4,360' where Big Chino Wash becomes the Verde River headwaters to 7,168' on Picacho Butte. Access to the unit's private, State trust, and public lands can be accessed by vehicle or on foot.
 
Government Agencies and Phone Numbers
Arizona Game and Fish Department, Region III - 928 692-7700
Prescott National Forest, Chino Ranger District - 928 636-2302
Arizona State Land Department, Prescott Office - 928 778-9567
 
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