Arizona Game and FIsh Department - Managing Today for Wildlife Tomorrow: azgfd.gov Arizona Game and Fish Department
  

Phone Number
BUY LICENSES | BIG GAME DRAW | eNEWS | CALENDAR | VIDEO | HUNTING | FISHING | WILDLIFE VIEWING | CONSERVATION | EDUCATION | BOATING | SHOOTING | OHV | SITE MAP | EMPLOYMENT
 
AZGFD Home
Online Services
Newsroom
Hunting & Fishing
Outdoor Recreation
 
Off-Highway Vehicles
Watercraft
Shooting Sports
Outdoor Expo
 
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Landowner Relations Program
Resources
FAQ's
Wildlife & Conservation
Information & Education
Inside AZGFD
Customer Service
 

Increase your odds for successful wildlife viewing

 

This feature is a reprint of a story that originally appeared in Arizona Wildlife Views.

Increase your odds for successful wildlife viewing            

Sometimes people are surprised that they don’t see wildlife easily when they go looking.
Remember, wildlife movies and TV documentaries need many hours of patient filming to get footage for the screen.

To increase your odds of a successful viewing experience, here are a few tips.

Places to Watch

In Arizona, water is the key for better viewing. Streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, basins and depressions holding water are good spots to watch (always from a distance, so you don’t disturb the animals’ natural behavior). Water enhances vegetation, and vegetation offers food, shelter and nesting sites. But dry washes hold wildlife, too. The vegetation uses water flowing underground. Plant growth is often quite apparent; plus, dry washes offer travel corridors.

Time of Day to Watch

Humans and wildlife are generally on different activity schedules. The weather and especially temperature dictate wildlife activity: When it is hot, animals lie low and don’t expend energy. So don’t expect to take an outdoor lunch break at midday and see wildlife easily.

The best times to look for mammals are at dawn and dusk (for crepuscular animals) or in the dark of night (for nocturnal animals). For birds, the major activity occurs early in the morning. If you get out before the sun comes up, you’ll notice what is often called the “dawn chorus.” A smaller evening activity peak occurs as birds head to their night roosts.

Go Slowly

While hiking, stop and wait. Be patient. As your senses heighten, sounds and movement will grab your attention. While you are stopped, don’t forget to look for small mammals, lizards, snakes, dragonflies and butterflies. These animals often are abundant and can be seen easily.

By moving more slowly, looking for water sources and getting on “wildlife time,” you can greatly increase your odds of seeing wildlife anywhere in Arizona.

—Joe Yarchin, Arizona Game and Fish Department watchable wildlife program manager

 
 
 
Featured User Photo [More]
"Butterfly". New! Submit Your Own Photos.

Videos [More]

Watchable Wildlife: White Mountains
NOTE: Video files may require the free Adobe Flash Player.
 
Related AZGFD Info
- Heritage Fund Program
- Economic Impact
- Environmental Education
- Information Products
- Sign up for AZGFD eNews
- Wildlife Photo Gallery
 
External Resources [More]
- Environmental Protection Agency
- National Wildlife Federation
NOTE: External sites will open in a new browser window.

Mission | Frequently Asked Questions | Web Policy | Send Comments | Employment | Commission Agenda | Office Locations | Site Map | Search | © 2013 AZGFD