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Exotic Newcastle Disease
 
Issued June 6, 2003
Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) Administrative Order Modified


Agency Directive::
The Arizona Department of Agriculture has issued a Director's Administrative Order to aid in the prevention of the spread of Exotic Newcastle Disease within the state of Arizona. Effective May 20, 2003 the previously issued quarantine order has been lifted for all counties in Arizona except the that portion of LaPaz County within the Colorado River Indian Tribe, which remains under quarantine. June 6, 2003 Jim deVos, Research Branch Chief

Contacts for Additional Information:
Anyone interested in additional information or an update of restrictions in movement of birds in Arizona can contact the Arizona Department of Agriculture hotline at 1-888-742-5334 or the Arizona Department of Agriculture website. Specific questions are being handled through e-mail to statevet@agric.state.az.us.

The U. S. Department of Agriculture also maintains a current website with information on Newcastle Disease.
 

Modified Administrative Order on Exotic Newcastle Disease Issued on April 2, 2003

Pursuant to the Arizona Department of Agriculture’s Administrative Order on Exotic Newcastle Disease, on March 3, 2003, the Director of the Arizona Game and Fish Department issued an order suspending the issuance of Field Trial Licenses, Field Trial Training Permits, and Shooting Preserve Licenses where birds would be transported from the premises where they were held. The Order was to remain in effect until the Arizona Department of Agriculture’s Administrative Order on Exotic Newcastle Disease was lifted.

On March 28, 2003, the Arizona Department of Agriculture issued a new Administrative Order that removed the restriction on bird events and movement of birds in all areas of Arizona except Yuma and LaPaz counties, and Mojave County south and east of the Colorado River where all movement of birds is still restricted. As a result of this new Department of Agriculture Administrative Order, the Director of the Arizona Game and Fish Department is ordering the following actions:

1. Effective April 3, 2003, the Department shall resume the issuance of all licenses that allow for the movement of birds except for those areas of the state that remain quarantined. These licenses include field trial, field trial training, and shooting preserve.

2. The Department shall notify in writing all licensees, including falconers1 and Game Farm licensees, who were affected by the March 3, 2003, Order, advising them that restrictions placed by the Arizona Department of Agriculture have been lifted except for Yuma and LaPaz counties, and Mojave County south and east of the Colorado River, where all previous restrictions apply.

ISSUED - APRIL 2, 2003

Duane L. Shroufe
Director

Notes:

1. The Department of Agriculture’s Administrative Order also precluded any event where falconers were to gather in a noticed hunting meet, as well as the movement of birds for a purpose defined as a “bird event” under the Department of Agriculture’s Order, and these individuals were notified by the Department of this action.

 
Exotic Newcastle Disease Found in Arizona
Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) has been confirmed in Arizona. On Feb. 4 END was confirmed in a backyard poultry flock in western Arizona, leading to the quarantine of portions of three Arizona counties.

End is a contagious viral disease affecting many species of birds including poultry and wild birds. The Arizona Game and Fish Department asks hunters and bird watchers to be on the alert for wild birds that may exhibit symptoms of this disease. This is probably one of the most infectious diseases of poultry in the world with a death rate of almost 100 percent in unvaccinated poultry flocks and so virulent that many birds die without showing any clinical signs. The disease can even infect and cause death in vaccinated poultry.

END is extremely contagious. The spread is primarily through direct contact between healthy birds and the bodily fluids of infected birds. It can be transmitted through infected bird droppings as well as secretions from the nose, mouth and eyes. It spreads rapidly among confined birds.. like commercially raised chickens. The disease is also easily spread by virus-bearing material picked up on shoes and clothing and carried from an infected flock to a healthy one. END can also spread from poultry flocks to wildlife as wild birds come into contact with infected poultry, possibly when wild birds enter a pen to feed on spilled grain. Although experiments have documented that several wild species including ducks and pheasants can develop the disease, widespread illness and death has only been documented in double-crested cormorants in the United States and Canada.

This disease affects the respiratory, nervous and digestive systems, with an incubation period ranging from two to 15 days.

Infected birds may exhibit the following signs:
Respiratory: sneezing, gasping for air, nasal discharge, coughing
Digestive: greenish, watery diarrhea
Nervous: muscular tremors, droopy wings, twisting head & neck, circling, complete paralysis
Partial or complete reduction in egg production
Production of thin-shelled eggs
Swelling of the tissues around the eyes & in the neck
Sudden death
Increased number of deaths in a flock

The available information suggests that Newcastle disease can affect people, however, it does not pose a significant health risk. In humans, the disease is usually limited to conjunctivitis, which is a mild inflammation of the tissues around the eyes and is seen in persons associated with infected birds or facilities where infected birds are housed. It should be noted that poultry products in the Arizona marketplace, including eggs and meat, continue to be safe to consume.

Anyone interested in additional information or an update of restrictions in the movement of birds in Arizona can contact the Arizona Department of Agriculture hotline at 1-888-742-5334 or the Arizona Department of Agriculture Web site: agriculture.state.az.us.
 
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