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Peregrine Falcon

 

Photo by Jim Burns

Peregrine Falcon Management

 

The peregrine falcon suffered large population declines because of the post World War II use of the pesticide DDT.  This pesticide decreased the female’s ability to release calcium to form eggs which significantly reduced reproduction rates. The peregrine falcon was placed under the protection of the Endangered Species Act in 1970, and the United States banned use of DDT in 1973.  With the help of organizations like The Peregrine Fund, peregrine falcon populations rebounded to between 2,000 and 3,000 nesting pairs.  In 1999, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided that the peregrine falcon no longer needed protection under the Endangered Species Act.  However, to ensure that peregrine numbers continue to grow, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will monitor the population every three years for 15 years.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department works with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to conduct this monitoring.  In Arizona, 60 sites were chosen statewide, with 20 occurring in each of the northern, central, and southern portions of the state.  Using agency personnel and volunteers for monitoring, the Arizona Game and Fish Department reports occupancy, nest success, and productivity at these sites to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Information is collected from all of the other states to assess how the population is doing since removing it from the Endangered Species Act.

 
 
Related AZGFD Info
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- Arizona Wildlife Raptors
- Arizona Bald Eagle Management Program
- Burrowing Owl Management
- Golden Eagle Management
- Living with Raptors
- Mexican Spotted Owl Managment, Camp Navajo
- Mitigation of Road Design for Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-owls
- Nest site selection by Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-owls in southern Arizona
- Raptor Managment Projects
- Raptor Species Accounts
- Raptors of Arizona PosterRaptors of Arizona Poster
- Raptor Surveys on the Florence Military Reservation
- Species of Greatest Conservation Need
- Sport Falconry
 
External Resources [More]
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- Airbourne Hunting Act
- Arizona Falconers Association
- Arizona Revised Statutes
- Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act
- Endangered Species Act
- Lacey Act
- Liberty Wildlife Rehabilitation
- Migratory Bird Treaty Act
- North American Bird Banding Lab
- North American Falconers Association
- The Peregrine Fund
- Raptor Research Foundation
- Southwestern Bald Eagle Management Committee
- Wild At Heart
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